Smartphone-Controlled Japanese Toilet Keeps A Personal Poop Diary


Satis Smartphone Toilet

Satis Smartphone Toilet via Lixil

The day will come, and come soon, when we will control our entire domestic lives with a phone. We will turn the lights on and off, we will change the temperature to the precise level we desire, we will cook our dinners and make our beds and brew our coffee and close our blinds and feed our pets with a tap and a swipe. We can do most of that now, in fact, though it’s kind of expensive and cobbled-together to implement.

A good step forward is the new Satis toilets from Lixil, which connects to an Android smartphone via Bluetooth so you can tell it to do all those amazing things Japanese toilets can do. Tap to extend the oddly phallic bidet hose. Scroll to lift the toilet seat or flush. Select your favorite song to play it through the toilet’s stereo, because the toilet has a stereo.

Perhaps the weirdest feature is that “you can set up a ‘toilet diary’ to monitor your visits to the can and check on your health,” according to JapanTrends, which adds that it includes “cute euphemistic symbols for what you managed to achieve on different days.” Not sure exactly how cute a symbol could be for what I personally “achieve” on the toilet, but I’m glad someone’s trying! The toilet should be released in February of next year.

[via JapanTrends]

Tara Reid Nina Moric


Life on Earth: The plant’s biodiversity map updated for the first time since 1876

  • Original map was drawn up by British naturalist Alfred Russel Wallace in 1876
  • New map shows the division of 20,000 species into 11 large biogeographic realms

By Mark Prigg

|

A map of biodiversity showing the organisation of terrestrial life on Earth has been updated after more than a century.

The original map, drawn up by British naturalist Alfred Russel Wallace in 1876, was the first attempt to depict the myriad ways life has evolved on the world’s continents.

Advances in modern technology and data on more than 20,000 species have now allowed scientists to chart biodiversity in far more detail.

The new map shows the division of nature into 11 large biogeographic realms and how they relate to each other.

The new map shows the division of nature into 11 large biogeographic realms and how they relate to each other.

AN ICONIC MAP

 The first attempt to describe the natural world in an evolutionary context was made in 1876 by Alfred Russel Wallace, the co-discoverer of the theory of natural selection, along with Charles Darwin.

Now his map has finally been updated.

The new map, published online by the journal Science, shows the division of nature into 11 large biogeographic realms and how they relate to each other.

Evolutionary and geographical information is combined for all known mammals, birds and amphibians – a total of more than 20,000 species.

A team of 15 international researchers took 20 years to compile the data.

Lead scientist Dr Ben Holt, from the Centre for Macroecology, Evolution and Climate at the University of Copenhagen in Denmark, said: ‘Our study is a long overdue update of one of the most fundamental maps in natural sciences.

‘For the first time since Wallace’s attempt we are finally able to provide a broad description of the natural world based on incredibly detailed information for thousands of vertebrate species.’

The freely available map can be split into finer geographical details for each class of animal.

The original map, drawn up by British naturalist Alfred Russell Wallace in 1876

The original map, drawn up by British naturalist Alfred Russell Wallace in 1876

Co-author Dr Jean-Philippe Lessard, from McGill University in Canada, said: ‘The map provides important baseline information for future ecological and evolutionary research.

‘It also has major conservation significance in light of the on-going biodiversity crisis and global environmental change.’

‘Whereas conservation planners have been identifying priority areas based on the uniqueness of species found in a given place, we can now begin to define conservation priorities based on millions of years of evolutionary history.’

Dr Carsten Rahbek, director of the Centre for Macroecology, Evolution and Climate, said the holistic description of the natural world provided by the map could be a ‘new cornerstone in fundamental biology’.

Barbara Schoeneberger Neriah Davis


Smartphone-Controlled Japanese Toilet Keeps A Personal Poop Diary


Satis Smartphone Toilet

Satis Smartphone Toilet via Lixil

The day will come, and come soon, when we will control our entire domestic lives with a phone. We will turn the lights on and off, we will change the temperature to the precise level we desire, we will cook our dinners and make our beds and brew our coffee and close our blinds and feed our pets with a tap and a swipe. We can do most of that now, in fact, though it’s kind of expensive and cobbled-together to implement.

A good step forward is the new Satis toilets from Lixil, which connects to an Android smartphone via Bluetooth so you can tell it to do all those amazing things Japanese toilets can do. Tap to extend the oddly phallic bidet hose. Scroll to lift the toilet seat or flush. Select your favorite song to play it through the toilet’s stereo, because the toilet has a stereo.

Perhaps the weirdest feature is that “you can set up a ‘toilet diary’ to monitor your visits to the can and check on your health,” according to JapanTrends, which adds that it includes “cute euphemistic symbols for what you managed to achieve on different days.” Not sure exactly how cute a symbol could be for what I personally “achieve” on the toilet, but I’m glad someone’s trying! The toilet should be released in February of next year.

[via JapanTrends]

Valeria Golino Janice Joplin


Most Facebook users get more from it than they put in, study says

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The Pew Research Internet Project released a report about Facebook on Friday, providing insights into the company that you won’t find in its IPO filing.

Rather than focusing on the company’s financials, the report “Why Most Facebook Users Get More Than They Give” sheds light on how Facebook’s 845 million users engage with Facebook and what they get out of it.

The findings show that social interactions on Facebook closely mirror social interactions in the real world.

For example, over the course of a one-month period, researchers found that women made an average of 11 updates to their Facebook status, while men averaged only six. Also, women were more likely to comment on other people’s status updates than men.

“There was a general trend in our data that women use Facebook more than men,” said Keith Hampton, a professor at Rutgers and lead author of the report. “This is a phenomenon that is not unique to Facebook. Women are traditionally in charge of social relationships offline, and that seems to be true of the online world as well.”

The report says men are more likely to send friend requests and women are more likely to receive them. That’s something else we see in the real world — especially in bars.

The report also says that most people who use Facebook get more out of it than they put into it, which may explain why they keep coming back.

Researchers found that 40% of Facebook users in a sample group made a friend request, while 63% received at least one friend request. They found that 12% of the sample tagged a friend in a photo, but 35% were themselves tagged in a photo. And each user in the sample clicked the “like” button next to a friend’s content an average of 14 times but had his or her own content ‘liked’ an average of 20 times.

Why the imbalance?

“There is this 20% to 30% who are extremely active who are giving more than they are getting, and they are so active they are making up for feeding everyone extra stuff,” Hampton said. “You might go on Facebook and post something and have time to click ‘like’ on one thing you see in your news feed, but then you get a whole bunch of ‘likes’ on your news feed. That’s because of this very active group.”

He also said extremely active users tend to have a niche: Some are really into friending, others are really into tagging photos, and still others click the ‘like’ button a lot. Rarely is any one user extreme in all those ways.

I asked Hampton what he could tell me about these extremely active people, whom he calls Facebook “power users.” Are they unstoppably social? Unemployed? Lonely?

“It could be people who are always active — whatever they are doing in their life, they are very active. Or it could be that just in the one month we observed them they are active and another month a different group of people would rise up,” he said. “It could be that there is something going on in their life that causes them to be very active, or it could be that some people think of it almost as a job to be active on Facebook.”

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– Deborah Netburn

Photo: A worker at Facebook’s headquarters in Menlo Park. Credit: Paul Sakuma/AP Photo

Barbara Bouchet Janice Renney


Lego for grown ups: The construction kit that can make a beer serving robot

  • New Makebot kit uses aluminium struts to allow complex structures
  • Electronic components can be added, and gadgets can even be controlled by a smartphone

 

By Mark Prigg

|

Billed as ‘Lego for adults’, a new construction kit is hoping to appeal to grown ups with a mechanical bent by bringing a bit of their childhood  a bit of childhood back for internet users.

However, rather than a spaceship or a castle, Makebot lets you build far more complex, robotic structures – including a beer pouring robot that can be controlled from a smartphone.

The Chinese firm is attempting to raise $30,000 to fund its starter kit – and has more than doubled its target on the Kickstarter site within hours.

Scroll down for video

The Makebot kit will allow users to build a variety of projects, from robots to a replica of Wall-E

The Makebot kit will allow users to build a variety of projects, from robots to a replica of Wall-E

 

It will provides hundreds of mechanical and electronic components with one main difference – for the grown up version, you’ll need a screwdriver to put it together.

the kits will be sold for between £12 ($20) and £245 ($399).

‘Makeblock is an aluminum extrusion based construct platform that can be used to bring your creations to life,’ the firm says.

‘With Makeblock you can make professional and steady robots, machines or even art-ware.

‘The only limit is what you can think of.’

However, rather than children’s Lego, Makeblock is slightly more complex.

‘With the Makeblock platform, the only necessary tool is a screw driver.’

To show off the system, the firm has released a video showing the creations people can make, including transporter robots and even a beer pouring device.

Other, more basic creations can include a spider like animal

Other, more basic creations can include a spider like animal

The unique building block can be slotted together with special screws

The unique building block can be slotted together with special screws

‘Makeblock is an aluminum version of Lego bricks,’ Makeblock founder Jasen Wang told CNN.

‘We’ve done some work to make the electronics and software more friendly to beginners.

‘We use uniform modular connectors with color tags to help you make the right connections, and we plan to have a smartphone app to let beginners interact with their robots without any programming.’

Electronic components, sensors and even DC motors can be added to creations without soldering thanks to specially designed connectors that screw into the building blocks

Electronic components, sensors and even DC motors can be added to creations without soldering thanks to specially designed connectors that screw into the building blocks

Creations such as a mobile tank can even be controlled via a smartphone app that uses Bluetooth to communicate with controller blocks

Creations such as a mobile tank can even be controlled via a smartphone app that uses Bluetooth to communicate with controller blocks

‘We have not yet seen something that lets people build robots with the ease and speed of electronic gadgets,’ the team say.

‘Our goal is to make the ultimate construction platform.

‘You can build paltforms with wheels, tanks tracks and rails to move a camera on – and there is even some connectivity with some Lego parts.

 

 

Jennifer Connelly Erika Eleniak


Samsung ATIV S listing obstacle was swept away, and got the network license

Recently, the Windows Phone 8 has become the new darling of the mobile operating system, the topic heat has even cought up with Android and iOS mobile operating system. The major mobile phone manufacturers have hurried to launch their own phones equipped with Windows Phone 8.

Samsung is no exception. According to the latest news, Samsung first Windows Phone 8 mobile phone ATIV S has obtained the network license, which means Samsung ATIV S last obstacle to release in the domestic market has been swept away.

Samsung ATIV S is equipped with 4.8-inch 720P Super AMOLED display which is the largest size among the WP8 phones, 1.9 million front camera and 8.0 million rear camera, the built-in storage space has 16GB and 32GB versions, and it supports microSD card expansion, NFC , Bluetooth 3.0 and some other functions. It is expected to be listed at the end of this year or January next year.

It is reported that the date when Samsung ATIV S gained the certification is December 13 this year, and the network license is WCDMA version. This phone also supports WCDMA, GSM (GPRS) signal systems.

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